Paternal Family Summary Page

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This page will try and tell the history of the Miley, Reid, Lee, and Marbut families, and how Noble Eugene Reid, my sister Mary Louise Reid/Prather, and brother Billy Don Reid, have been lucky enough to have made it this far down the linage of an unbeliveable family, that had to go through some of the hardest times, and some of the better times to finally arrive here in the twilight of 2004. The biological known fact, is that there are two people in any given time frame needed to create a new human being. Knowing that everyone has a mother and a father, paints a picture of who they were and how they arrived in this world. Trying to find out your roots is a enjoyable, but sometimes tedious research into the past. Not all people, but most people know their immediate parents, and most know their grandparents, but when it gets to another generation removed, then it starts to get a little fuzzy, and information comes about by word of mouth, stories handed down, or an entry in the family bible. Just putting down names and dates is okay to know who your ancestors are, but there should be more about the times and history of the time they lived in to get a better view of what was going on in the different generations. The Miley, Reid, Lee, and Marbut families make up this summary page. Without the Miley ancestors, there would not be a line down to Nancy Cathryn Miley and James Ashall Reid. Without the Lee family, there would not be Susie Rachel Lee to meet Andrew Levi Reid. Without the Marbut family, there would not be Mary Cathony Marbut and John Washington Lee, the parents of Susie, and without our namesake family there would not be a line down to James and Andrew. This summary will be a try at better getting an idea of what went on where, when, and how, the four families all came together to make it possible for us three and those related to us to be here on this earth.

The state of South Carolina seems to play a very large part in the history of our family. It was one of the 13 original states, it had a degree of settlement in the mid 1700's, and land grants were made available to anyone that would develop and live on that land. Of course late in history the state was the scene of many battles, that took the lives of some of this family...

It is not known at this time how our long ago grandparents, Henry and Jane Miley landed in America, but we do know that they settled in the Camden District of South Carolina sometime around 1760. Its funny that the Camden District wasn't into being until 1769, so they could have been in one of at least five counties that covered most of the northern part of the state. In February of 1762 they had a boy they named Robert. Robert Miley's early history is very limited, but we do know that he was in the latter part of the Revolutionary War. the dates of 1781 and 1784 are years that are shown by military records. These dates will also be important to the history later on in the saga. We know Robert married Elizabeth Smoak who was 26 years younger than he was. They moved down to the southern part of the state, just above Georgia to Barnwell County, S.C. There they had a son they named Andrew Barnwell Miley. I guess when he was born, Robert and Elizabeth decided to name him after Revolutionary War leader, John Barnwell. It probably fit, because of the town and leader and Robert's respect for the man. The history takes a turn here because Robert dies in April of 1818, only the fourth month after young Andrew is born. What happened in this period can only be speculation, but sometime after 1820, Elizabeth remarries to a Mr. Thomas Caldwell, so it seems that him and a few of his older brothers and sisters had someone to take care of them. We don't know exactly when, but Elizabeth leaves Barnwell County and moves to Colleton County which is on the Atlantic coast of South Carolina. There Elizabeth dies in 1828 when Andrew Miley is ten years old. It is not likely that Mr Caldwell raised young Andrew. It is more likely that the older kids took him in to raise. Andrew grows up and meets, and later marries Martha McKinney in April of 1835. They are married less than two years when Martha takes sick and dies. After Martha dies, he marries her sister, Mary Mckinney in April of 1837. Then when he is about 24 years old, he takes the family and migtates to Alabama...

Further history tells us that Andrew Barnwell Miley with a wife and three kids arrive some where in Covington County, Alabama. The county is located at the most south central part of the state, just above Florida. He started a homestead, and probably farmed several hundred acres. As posted in the web pages, he became a little of everything. He was a Lt Col. in the 1st Battalion of Covington, pastor of the Bethel Primitive Baptist Church, and belonged to prominent Farmers Groups, and was a county court judge for a year. He also had slaves on his farm, a girl for in the house, and three men for the fields. All this was taking place around the fall and winter of 1846, through the fall and winter of 1862. At the end of this period, there is smell of war in the air as the Civil War has begun. He has a pretty good size family by then, and the conditions in that part of Alabama were probably very tense. Andrew and and his son Andrew Jr. played their parts in the Civil War. At the age of 47, Andrew Sr. was a private in Capt. Geo W. Kiercit's Co. A of the Covington County Reserves, Home Guard. He did not carry a gun as he was a minister of the gospel. Andrew Jr. was a 1st Lt. in Capt Gantt's Co. 4th Regiment, Alabama Volunteers. Of course, things didn't get real bad until the ending of the Civil War. Alabama was in terrible shape after the Civil War...

With the surrender of General Lee in mid April of 1865, military rule was imposed until 1868. Civil government ceased to exist, and the state was in dire financial need. Crops had been poor during and after the war, and taxes were just to heavy to bear. Thousands of farmers were unable to pay their taxes, and the carpetbaggers and money men from the north began forcing their sales by the state. In the spring of 1865 the citizens of Alabama were destitute. Banks were closed, Confederate Bonds and paper money was worthless. The states most valuable property of slaves and cotton were beyond the control of their former owners. Andrew Barnwell Miley and family were devestated by the Civil War. They were toiling long hours in a desperate attempt to get crops planted. The task seemed futile. Farm machinery was worn out, and could not be replaced, draft animals were nearly non-existent, their bones littering every southern battlefield. Most were of little use anyway, standing gaunt and weak from lack of feed. The carpetbaggers ruled the state. It is not difficult to imagine why Andrew B. Miley decided to take the family and move to Texas...

Some say the Mileys came to Texas immediatly after the Civil War, and then again it was 1868/69, or part of the family came early, followed by Andrew after settling up his affairs in Alabama. They settled in Bastrop County Texas. The county is located a little southeast of Austin. Why they picked Bastrop County, is anyone's guess, but it seems like a lot of families left the Civil War states and headed to Texas. Andrew Barnwell Miley Jr. was the seventh child, and Nancy Cathryn Miley was the nineth child of Andrew Sr. and Mary. This is pretty significant, because there was a boy and girl in Bastrop County that caught their eye. How each of them met and where exactly they lived in regards to one another is not known, but we know that Andrew Barnwell Miley Jr. caught the eye of Rebecca Gregg Reid, and Nancy Carthryn Miley caught the eye of James Ashall Reid. This is where the Miley/Reid family comes together. The Miley brother and sister marries the Reid brother and sister. One part of that union, the James Ashall Reid and Nancy Cathryn Miley marriage is why us three are here on this earth...

The area just north of Belfast Ireland lies Antrim County, and the town of Antrim. It is here that Robert Reid and his wife were born and eventually they meet and get married. What life was like in those times can only be imagined. As we know, they had a mother and father, and a grandmother and grandfather, so history goes on back farther in time. To find their names and birth dates and any kind of history would tell a story to marvel at...

Research shows that Robert Reid and his wife Rebecca Gregg, migrated from Ireland sometime after 1776, because their first three children, Jane, Agnes, and Thomas were born there, and their fourth child, Elizabeth was born in South Carolina...

The fourth child named Elizabeth, was born on February 14, 1777 in Chester County, South Carolina. Here we are again in the northern part of the state which will become the Camden District. If it sounds familiar, it is also the area that Henry and Jane Miley settled in some 15 or so years earlier. We can only wonder if at some place or time that they may have met at a church, at the county fair, a town meeting, or in passing on some street somewhere. Both families grew and even moved to different parts of the District, so it isn't out of the question that they could have crossed paths during this part of family history. If you lived in Ireland and wanted to come to America, you would want to know where the other people that were leaving would know to go. The word must have been passed back to families that South Carolina was a great place to settle...

Robert's son James Reid Sr. was born in 1785 and grew up in York County, South Carolina where he meets Rhoda Hutchinson. They marry in early 1800's and live in York Co. for about 25 years, and then move up to Tipton County, South Carolina in the 1820's and stay there until sometime around 1829. They leave South Carolina and move to Tennessee. Here their last two children are born. It is during this time that James and his two oldest boys head to Texas to look for new land to settle on. Rhoda moves the family next to her brothers place in DeSoto County, Mississippi. Here they stay until James sends Thomas to bring them to what we know now as Bastrop County, Texas

It looks like James Reid Sr. was the first of the Reid's to migrate to Texas, either in late 1836 or early 1837. James died shortly after getting to Texas. It was his sons Thomas and Samuel and his widow Rhoda that was instrumental in obtaining and finalizing his homestead rights to his Bastrop County land. Going back to 1804, James and Rhoda bring to life their first born son they name Thomas...

The route Thomas Reid took to Texas is a little different than his fathers. Being born in York County, South Carolina he probably did mostly what all younsters did living on a farm and having to do the chores. When we were younger, we lived on a farm in the 1940's, so we know that your work is never done. There is alway something to be done. Thomas's early life is left to speculation as to where or exactly when he meets Sarah Dancer, who is to become his wife. On September 01, 1836, Sarah and Thomas are married in South Carolina, the year before the family moves to Texas. Sarah Dancer was born in Franklin County, Alabama in 1817. Her father was Ashall Dancer, a farmer who also migrated to Texas about the same time as the Reid's did. Whether Ashall was a minister of sorts in Alabama, we find that he was a traveling minister after going to Texas. Life in the newly settled Bastrop County was anything but easy because of the Indian tribes and Mexican farmers that where there, and didn't get along with the new settlers. In fact Ashall Dancer's son, John Dancer, was killed on September 18, 1842 at the Massacre of Dawson's men who were trying to help save San Antonio in the last battle against Mexico for the Republic of Texas. We can also imagine how hard it was to travel by team and wagon from South Carolina to Texas during that time. They make it, and their first child Mary, is born in Texas in 1837. Thomas becomes a very well known man in the next few years buying and selling land. Him and Sarah prosper and are able to raise ten children...

The eighth child of this marriage is our great grandfather, James Ashall Reid. He is named for both his grandfathers, James Reid Sr. and Ashall Dancer. This is in 1852, fifteen years after the family made the long hard trip from South Carolina to Texas. James grew up in the enviroment of many new families coming to Bastrop County from mostly the southern states. When James was around sixteen or seventeen, there moved to the County, a family named Miley. And in that family was a young girl whose name was Nancy Cathryn Miley. Young James meets Nancy who is to become our great grandmother...

Both families were in the same area of South Carolina. One family stays around the area, then moves to Texas. The other moves to Alabama, but still comes later and settles in the same county in Texas...

James and Nancy marry in 1873, and settle down in Bastrop County for a while. They begin their family, and while in Bastrop County, their fifth child is born, a boy they name Andrew Levi Reid. This is a name that we are familiar with. We have sat on grandpa's knee at one time or another when we were little. Around 1890 they first move north to Bell County where their last child Luckett is born. Then, James and Nancy leave Bell County and head north to Hill County Texas sometime just before the turn of the century. Hill County is between Dallas, and Waco. Sometime, somewhere, grandpa Andrew Levi meets a very pretty girl. Her name is Susie Rachel Lee. She is to become our grandmother...

The Lee family is filled with a lot of history that one reads about in history books. It looks like we become intertwined with some of that history. If we start clear back to England on this Lee line, then we are going back to circa 1590. We know that there is research farther on back, because this family of Lee's are probably researched as much as any family concidering how famous it is...

Stropshire and Worchester County are located in the central part of England, close to the city of Birminghan. They border each other. Here is where our long ago grandfather John Lee was born in 1590. John was only 40 years old when he died, but he had time to meet and then marry a girl from Twining, which is twelve miles south of Worchester in the county of Glouchester. Her name was Jane Hancock. Like the Lee's. the Hancock family were also in the cloth trade in England. After their marriage they settle in Stropshire County, and that is where in 1618 they have one son who they name Richard. This is the Richard that becomes the Immigrant. Through one of Richard's uncle, he is brought to London where he becomes known to Sir Francis Wyatt, who in turn was the first Royal Govenor. When, at the request of King Charles the First, Sir Francis returns to Virginia, Richard sails to America with him and becomes the clerk of the quarter court within the Secretary of States office. Anne Constable, who we know to become Richard's wife, was baptized in London in 1622. She was one of the many daughters born to Francis Constable. Because of her fathers connections, Anne became a ward of Sir John Thorowgood, a personal attendant upon King Charles the First. This connection made her connected to the same Sir Francis Wyatt, and she too sailed to America on the same ship as her husband to be. They are married in 1641 at Jamestown, Virginia, but settle in the very northern part of the state, just a stones throw from Maryland. Here they raise ten children from 1643 through 1656. He becomes Col Richard Lee I after he names his second boy Richard, who in turn becomes Richard Lee II. In 1664, Richard I dies at the age of 46 at his last home in Dividing Creek, Northcumberland County Virginia. Anne lives on to 1706 and dies at home where they are both buried...

This paragraph is to show our connection to some of the most famous Lee's in history. Col Richard Lee II is one of our great uncles. Richard marries Laetitia Corbin, and this union produces Thomas Lee who was born in Mt Pleasant, Westmoreland County, Virginia. Thomas Lee in turn grows up and then marries Hannah Harrison Ludwell. Thomas builds the famous Stratford Hall mansion. Hannah bears two sons for Thomas who are named Richard Henry Lee, and Francis Lightfoot Lee, who in turn will forever be remembered as two of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Is that famous people? Many years later on in Stratford Hall is born a Civil War General named Robert E. Lee. We know that some of our ancestors fought for the South, and can only imagine if sometime or another our grandparents might have seen the great General as he moved about Alabama and Tennessee rallying the cry for the Confederacy...

In 1656, the last child of Richard I and Anne is born, a boy they name Charles Lee. Charles is only eight years old when his father dies, but he still has his mother, and older brothers Richard Lee II and Hancock Lee to help raise him. Before his death in 1700, Charles grows up to meet Elizabeth Medstand. Charles and Elizabeth raise seven children, and he builds Cobb's Hall Mansion. Cobbs Hall is located in Northcumberland County, Virginia. It has to be great living at that time for the Lee's. They seem to have money, a standing in the community, politically involved in the affairs of the country. This is the turn of the century of 1700. England still rules the colonies, and it is still a long ways off from what history tells us was the beginning of our new nation. Charles Lee is the last child of Richard I and Anne Constable, and is our connection to the Lee's of Virginia. In 1679 the first child of Charles and Elizabeth is born at Cobb's Hall. They name him John Thomas Lee...

Not to much is known about John Thomas Lee, but we do know that he grows up around Cobb's Hall and meets a girl we only know as Anne. Something happens to Anne, because he marries his second wife, Elizabeth Keene in 1730. They do have a son the following year. It may have been their only child, because no other children are listed in their family. John Thomas was the first child of seven from Charles and Elizabeth, but it looks like it was around his 50th birthday before he marries Elizabeth Keene. Their only child is also named John Lee...

Unlike his father, this only son, John Lee II is a mover and a shaker. after he grows up, he fathers fourteen children by three different women. Where we almost miss the boat with John Thomas, we hit the jackpot with John. Where our family tree branch could have easily stopped, it gathers speed with all kinds of relation. Two of his wives had the last name of Lee. First cousins? Don't know. Of course there were other Lee families living in the colonies at that time, so it is just speculation. His first wife was Lucy Ann Lee, and gave John two boys. The first he names him John after his own name, and the second was named Francis. This first born John Lee III is our direct descendant. What happens to Lucy Ann is not known, but he marries Margaret Howard. They have five children together. Again we don't know what happened to her. He marries his third wife, Mary Lee, and she bears him seven children...

Being the first born of fourteen children, This John Lee III would have grown up early, so it is assumed that he left Virginia. We have no birthdate on him, so it a little hard to put him in an era to know exactly what was happening during his time. We do know that he died in 1815 at Giles County, Tennessee. What he was doing, or where he was during the Revolutionary War is not known. He would have probably been in his mid teens at the height of the war and was too young to be involved. More than likely he headed south after the war, and settled in Giles County. It seems like it was the custom to name at least one of your sons after the father. The John Lee name is unbroken through a long line of Lee's, and it holds true to this John when he meets and later marries Elizabeth Smith from Hawkins County, Tennessee. They name their sixth child John M. Lee. Although this John isn't on our direct line it just shows the name keeps going. Our line continues with the birth of their next child, who they name Benjamin Jefferson Lee. Here we squeeze by again, because Ben in born in September of 1813, and his father dies two years later in 1815. Once again a young child is raised by his mother and older kids. Elizabeth lives another 40 years until her death in 1855...

As stated, Benjamin was born on September 13, 1813 In Giles County, Tennessee, and marries Susanna Pate from nearby Lynnville, Tennessee. Ben and Susanna have seven children and as the time is passing it is becoming closer to the era of the Civil War. We don't know, but we figure that Ben and Susanna were married in the mid to late 1830's and around 1844, their third child was born. His is named Louemus Lee, and at the tender age of 18, he enlisted in the Confederate Army. The sad part is that he was wounded and captured at the battle of Fort Donaldson in 1862 and never survived his wounds. It struck the parents really hard, and then to find out that one of Susanna's brothers also died in the fighting. This family sticks it out through the war years in Giles County and even seems to survive the Carpetbaggers that came down from the north to grab what spoils of war they could get their hands on. Down in Alabama there is a Miley family that is leaving the war torn south, and moving on to Texas. Already in Texas are a bunch of Reid families that have already settled and are waiting for fate to step in. In 1876, Susanna Pate passes away and is buried in Giles County. Ben's family still farms the land and, and in 1851 his sixth child is born and is named John Washington Lee. John grows up in Giles County and finds love in the woman of Mary Cathony Marbut, our great grandmother...

John Washington Lee was born on March 18, 1851 in Giles County. John was nine years old when the war started, and never got old enough to do anything because it was over in 1865. As stated he grows up and somewhere meets Mary Cathony Marbut. She was born just down the road from where he lived in Pulaski, Tennessee. They marry when he is 24 and she is 17 years old. They settle down and start a family, and what a family, eighteen months after they were married the first boy was born and they never stopped until there were nine kids born. nine kids in 13 years. We can wonder what life was like in Giles County after the war. It seems they did better than most, but even long after the war was over, the talk of the Hill County country and the abundant land in Texas had to be all over the south after the war, so in 1892, John W. sold the farm and made the long hard trip to Hill County, Texas. William was the oldest at 16 and Myrtle was the youngest at three years. What a sight it must have been to see them on the road. They make it to Hill County, Texas, and unknowing to their ten year old daughter, there is an twelve year old boy that is leaving Bastrop County, and is also headed for Hill County. The ten year old girl is John W's fourth child Susie Rachel Lee, and the boy from Bastrop County, is Andrew Levi Reid. They are to become our grandparents. Susie's mother Mary Cathony Marbut lands in Giles County, TN on a much differnt route than Susie's father did...

Giles County, Tennessee is located in the extreme southern part of the state just above the Alabama state line. Minor Hill, of Giles County, is a small town that was the center of Susie Rachel Lee's life after her birth on March 16, 1882. Marbut's Post Office is down the road a piece, and now is just an entry in a list of historical Post Offices...

Hessen-Hanau Germany, is a district located near Frankfurt, Germany. The immigrant Johannes Meerbott was born on the 24th of July 1756 in the village of Hochstadt, Hessen-Hanau, Germany. He is almost certainly the ancestor of all persons bearing the surnames Marbut. It is Johannes that changes the name from Meerbott to Marbut. We can go back to his ggrandfather Anton, 1655 to 1713, then to his grandfather Johann Casper, 1681 to 1758, to his father Johann Phillip Meerbott, and mother Anna Margaretha Kapps. This last marriage produces the main ancestor that is responsible for the Marbuts coming to America...

The living conditions and political climate in that part of Germany, can only be read about, or thought of as being harsh and hard. In 1776 when the Revolutionary war starts in America, the King of England makes a deal with the King of Germany, to send mercenary soldiers to fight for Britian. Johannes is a 19 year old boy that is caught up in this request for troops, and is sent across the sea to fight on the side of the British. He lands in Quebec in June of 1776, but is captured in October of 1777. He is held in Winterhill, Mass. for a little over a year, and then is marched with the other captives for about two months or so to Charlottsville, Virginia, to arrive in January of 1779. In school history we read about how hard and bad the winters were on George Wasington and his troop at Valley Forge. You can only imagine how it was for prisoners of war in that part of the country. This internment lasts into 1782 where he uses the act of indenturing himself to work out his capture. About six or so months after his doing this, there is a prisoner exchange on May 12, 1783. We can think that after that exchange, he would probably have been let out of his comittment and be able to return to Germany or stay in America. He was on the list of prisoners that remained in America after the war. We pick him up a year later when he hires himself out to a family in Pennsylvania...

Joshua Inman and his wife Anne was living in Pennsylvania as of 1784. They took in a immigrant named Johannes Meerbott from Hanau Germany. The conditions of what he was to do, and how long he was there is not known, but supposedly, after a while and falling in love, he took a mule and a few belongings and eloped with their daughter Sarah to the Newberry District of South Carolina. They were married on April 02, 1787 in Newberry, and began a family. They did name their first boy Joshua after Sarah's father. In 1803, after changing his name to John Marbut, he received his citizenship papers and became an American citizen. It is likely that John didn't say to much about his war experience, because he put on his naturalization papers that he arrived from Hanau, Germany in 1784. John and Sarah have their third child, a boy who they named John Marbut II.

After John and Sarah passed away while still living in Newberry, it looks like some of their children migrated to Giles County, Tennessee, because this is where we again pick up John Marbut II. Here is where he meets Anna Thomas, and on July 30, 1811 they are married. John II and Anna raise a large family. In fact, Anna bore fourteen children. It must have been one noisy home at dinner time. The nineth childs is a boy, and is named John Adams Marbut...

This John Adams Marbut was born on April 17, 1825 in Newberry before his parents moved to Giles County. John meets and later marries Elizabeth F. Sanders, and together they have eight children. Elizabeth dies in 1887 in Giles County, but John lives on till 1900, and for some reason winds up in Limestone County, Alabama, where he passes away. The sixth child from this marriage is a girl, and they name her Mary Cathony Marbut. They are living in the area of Marbut's Post Office, Tennessee, and it is the place of her birth...

Mary Cathony Marbut, was born on April 18, 1858 in Marbut's Post Office, Tennessee. She is from a family of eight children, and it seems that the Marbut's were a fairly well off family. They farm large tracts of land, and the area is known to have many Marbut farms. In this area in 1851 there is a boy by the name of John Washington Lee. He is seven years older than Mary Cathony, but somewhere, at sometime these two meet each other. Here we have John W. Lee decending from the Virginia Lee's, and Mary decending from the South Carolina Marbut's. They meet in Giles County and marry on January 13, 1875. They have went through the Civil War, the reconstruction of the South, the freeing of the slaves, and still find time to have a family. They still prosper, and are able to start raising what will turn out to be ten children. After seventeen years, there is talk of moving on to Texas. For what reason other than John W. got the unsettled bug, they decided to head for Hill County, Texas. In this long and trying move is a ten year old girl, Susie Rachel Lee.

Susie Rachel Lee is the fifth child of John and Mary. She was born on March 16, 1882. Susie is as unconcerned as a ten year old can be at that age, but at the end of their jouney waits a boy that will become her husband, and will be our grandparents. It is a wonder that our grandparents ever met. John Washington was so unsettled, that he moved back and forth from Texas, back to Tennesee, back to Texas. It was after Susie met Andrew, that John settled down where he died, and is buried in Navarro County, Texas...

Susie Rachel Lee, and Andrew Levi Reid, arrive in Hill County, Texas about the same time in 1892. We hope during later research, we find out a little more of how they meet. We do know that around seven years after moving to Hill County, and Susie meets Andrew from Bastrop County, they are married. Their first child is Aunt Ruthie, born in December of 1900, then James Awbry, then Alfred Preston, then on August 10, 1906, which is Andrew Levi's 26th birthday, our father Levi Grady Reid is born. They are living in Whitney, Texas which isn't to far from Peoria and Hillsboro. After Grady comes Joseph Dudley, and then Olin Douglas. It is storied that about four years after Douglas is born, Susie takes sick and passes away. Aunt Ruthie and Andrew's niece, Bunah Reid helps to raise the younger kids. About four or five years after Susie Rachel passes away, Andrew Levi remarries. He marries Minnie Mae Carrol on June 01, 1919. Grandpa Andrew fathers fifteen children with Minnie. One boy and one girl don't survive their birth, but thirteen do, and with the other kids, he fathers a total of twenty one children. All the Reid boys were tough as leather, and had to work hard in their young lives. Our father survives the hard times in his early life. He only goes through the eight grade of school before having to quit and help support the family. In due time, and in the mid 1920's he meets a young girl from the Wolford family, who's name is the connection that makes us three possible. She is Mable Harriet Wolford, and our father asks John Thomas Wolford for her hand in marriage. They are married in 1927, and three years later their first born is a girl they name Mary Louise. In 1933 after moving from Crosby County to Floyd County, their first son is born who is named Noble Eugene, and moving back to Crosby County in 1936, they have their youngest son, Billy Don. Here we are, the results of so many different connections that had to connect for us to be here...

The above sections are the paternal part of our ancestoral past. The Miley's from South Carolina, to Alabama, and on to Bastrop County Texas, The Reid's from Ireland, to South Carolina, to a short stay in Mississippi, then on to Bastrop County, Texas. Nancy Cathryn Miley meets James Ashall Reid, The Reid/Miley line connects, and then to Hill County Texas. Down the line we connect to the Gregg family through Rebecca, the McKinney family, through Martha and her sister Mary, then the Hutchinson family, through Rhoda.

From Stropshire, England comes the Immigrant Richard Lee, and his descendants. We connect to the Constable family through Ann. After many years in Virginia, the Lee's migrate to Giles County, Tennessee. From Hessen-Hanau, Germany, comes Johannes Meerbott/Marbut to Pennsylvania, to South Carolina to Giles County, Tennessee. John Washington Lee meets Mary Cathony Marbut, and the Lee/Marbut line connects and its on to Hill County, Texas. The four families are in Hill County, Texas at the same time. The union of Susie Rachel Lee and Andrew Levi Reid is the paternal connection of our ancestors. Their offspring of Levi Grady Reid makes it possible for him to meet his future wife to continue the family line...

There are other marriages that connect this family. Joseph Dudley marries Lillian Lee, the daughter of William Edward Lee, who in turn is the brother of great grandfather, John Washington Lee. Andrew Barnwell Miley Jr, who is our great grandfather, marries Rebecca Gregg Reid, James Ashall Reid's sister... It is noted that Rebecca carries on her grandmothers name as her own...

Close calls with two wars, and untold childhood diseases, and the everyday dangers of living in those times, makes it seem almost a miracle that our ancestors made it to meet and marry down through the generations for us to be here. This is only one side. As it is stated in the beginning, it take two to make a family. The journey of our mothers side has to come down to Hill County, Texas for all of this to make sense. The Maternal Summary page will try and tell that journey...

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